Sub-Saharan Africa

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In Sub-Saharan Africa, MenCare partners are engaging men as caregivers and as fathers through powerful media campaigns, high-impact program development, and local- and national-level advocacy initiatives in seven countries. In Botswana, Cabo Verde, Ethiopia, Namibia, RwandaSouth Africa, and Uganda, our partners focus on issues ranging from gender equality and violence prevention to masculinities and men’s health.

Across the region, MenCare partners are reaching fathers through group education and community campaigns to engage men in sexual and reproductive health, maternal and child health, women’s economic empowerment, and caregiving. As part of the campaign, powerful films from Rwanda and South Africa tell the stories of men who challenge stereotypes to become more involved caregivers for their children. In Rwanda, work with the Ministry of Health aims to increase health knowledge and positive decision-making among young people, fathers, and couples. In South Africa, advocacy initiatives encourage policymakers to take a stand against corporal punishment and to legislate paid leave for new parents. From Ethiopia to Namibia, work with men and boys has led to positive transformations in the gender norms and behaviors that serve as barriers to involved fatherhood.

For more information on MenCare in Africa, check out the regional highlights below, and learn more about the MenCare+ program in Rwanda and South Africa.

Recent News Show me more

Engaging men as gender-equitable fathers and caregivers to reduce malnutrition in Mozambique

Concern Worldwide is working to address chronic malnutrition and extreme poverty in Mozambique by engaging men in shared caregiving and gender equality, as part of its Linking Agribusiness and Nutrition (LAN) project in the country’s Manica and Zambezia provinces. No father wants an unhealthy or unhappy family, which is what initially motivates most men to join Concern’s LAN project

All fathers and adoptive parents need paid parental leave

Man holding baby and cooking in South Africa.

In 2011 Douglas Newman-Valentine, a 28-year-old nursing lecturer, and his husband, Marlow, adopted a baby girl — and, as is usual for any new parent, needed to take time off work to care for her. Douglas’s employer, the University of Cape Town (UCT), took the progressive step of offering him four months’ paid paternity leave.

Videos Show me more

MenCare Short: South Africa

Fatherhood is a gift to children, but it's also a gift to dads. In Khayelitsha, Themba inspires his younger brother, Andrew, who is about to become a father.

MenCare Short: Rwanda

Landuwari journeys to an understanding that sharing the work at home, supporting women's economic empowerment, and girls' education benefits the entire family.

Being a Father: A State of the World’s Fathers Film

Produced alongside the first-ever State of the World’s Fathers report, "Being a Father" asks fathers, mothers, and children from around the world: "What does fatherhood mean to you?"

Publications Show me more

Program P
Program P

Program P is MenCare's manual for engaging men in fatherhood, in caregiving, and in maternal, newborn, and child health.

Progress towards prohibiting all corporal punishment of children in East and Southern Africa
Progress towards prohibiting all corporal punishment of children in East and Southern Africa

The briefing highlights the human rights imperative to prohibit all violent punishment of children.

MenCare+ South Africa Outcome Measurement Report
MenCare+ South Africa Outcome Measurement Report

This evaluation analyzes the efficacy and impact of the MenCare+ program in South Africa.

State of Africa’s Fathers
State of Africa’s Fathers

Adapted from the first State of the World’s Fathers 2015, this regional report focuses on men’s caregiving practices in Africa.